Digital Texts

Eugene Irey’s concordance to the 1903-1904 Centenary Edition of Emerson’s Works is available at the Concord Free Public Library page.

Emerson’s works are available digitally:

The University of Michigan offers a digital edition of the Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Centenary Edition

Selected works are available at The American Transcendentalism Site

Poems from Emerson’s various poetry volumes are available through the American Verse Project at Michigan (1899 Early Poems text or 1904 Centenary Edition text), on The RWE, on Emerson Texts (1899 Early Poems), and Jone Johnson Lewis’ site (mainly from the 1899 Early Poems). Former President Bill Clinton reads the Concord Hymn.

A large selection of Emerson’s Uncollected Prose, including the majority of his writings that appeared in the Dial, has been digitized by the University of Adelaide.

A nearly complete selection of Emerson’s works are available at The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Other online sources for Emerson’s works are:

Nature; see also Ann Woodlief’s hypertext edition of Nature

Essays: First Series; & via the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” and the University of Virginia

Essays: Second Series; & via the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” and the University of Virginia

Nature; Addresses, and Lectures; & via the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” and the University of Virginia

Representative Men; & via the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” and the University of Virginia

English Traits; & via the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” and the University of Virginia

The Conduct of Life; & via the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” and the University of Virginia

Poems: selections from Emerson’s various poetry volumes are available through the American Verse Project at Michigan (1899 Early Poems text or 1904 Centenary Edition text), on Jim Manley’s site, on Emerson Central (1899 Early Poems), and Jone Johnson Lewis’ site (mainly from the 1899 Early Poems).

An alphabetical list of links to Emerson’s essays follows:

“Address on Emancipation in the British West Indies”.
“American Scholar” (from Nature; Addresses, and Lectures)
“Art” (Essays: First Series)
“Behavior”
“Beauty”
“Character” (Essays: Second Series)
“Circles”
“Compensation”
“The Conservative”
“Considerations by the Way”
“Courage”
“Culture”
Divinity School Address (from Nature; Addresses, and Lectures)
“Education”
“Europe and European Books”
“Experience”
“Fate”
“Friendship”
“Gifts”
“Goethe; or, the Writer”
“Heroism”
“History”
“Illusions”
“Intellect”
“Introductory Lecture” [to “Lectures on the Times”]
“A Letter”
“Literary Ethics” (from Nature; Addresses, and Lectures)
“The Lord’s Supper”
“Love”
“Manners”
“Man the Reformer”
“Mary Moody Emerson”
“The Method of Nature” (from Nature; Addresses, and Lectures)
“Michael Angelo”
“Montaigne; or, the Skeptic”
“Napoleon; or, the Man of the World”
“Nature”
“New England Reformers”
“Nominalist and Realist”
“The Over-Soul”
“Past and Present”
“Plato; or, the Philosopher”
“The Poet”
“Politics”
“Power”
“Prayers”
“Prudence”
“Self-Reliance”
“Shakespeare; or, the Poet”
“The Sovereignty of Ethics”
“Spiritual Laws”
“Swedenborg; or, the Mystic”
“Thoreau”
“Thoughts on Modern Literature”
“The Transcendentalist”
“Uses of Great Men”
“Walter Savage Landor”
“War”
“Wealth”
“Woman”
“Worship”
“The Young American”